New Imaging Technology Enhances Prostate Care

MedStar Georgetown University Hospital is one of only four hospitals in the nation to offer a powerful new technology in the fight against prostate cancer.

January 31, 2014

Two Systems Merge to Track like the GPS in Your Car

(January 31, 2014 Washington, D.C.) – MedStar Georgetown University Hospital is one of only four hospitals in the nation to offer a powerful new technology in the fight against prostate cancer. A new targeted approach to biopsy the prostate combines magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ultrasound imaging to guide biopsies with unprecedented precision. This new biopsy method provides a higher level of care for many patients with elevated and/or rising prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels – a known indicator for prostate cancer.

The combination of two systems, DynaCAD for Prostate and the UroNav fusion biopsy system, fuses pre-biopsy MRI images of the prostate with ultrasound-guided biopsy images in real time, allowing for greater visual analysis of the prostate and any suspicious lesions.

“We are one of four urology practices in the United States using this device,” noted Dr. John Lynch, chair of Urology at MedStar Georgetown. “This allows us to achieve precise, targeted biopsies for patients who have previous negative prostate biopsies and rising PSAs or who are on active surveillance for prostate cancer.

“The process is simple. Patients get an MRI and our radiologists mark any abnormal areas,” continued Dr. Lynch. “The patient then comes to our Urology office for the biopsy. The device allows me to pull up their MRI image, fuse it with their ultrasound image and directly biopsy any abnormal areas with excellent precision.”

The fusion of the MRI and ultrasound images uses electromagnetic tracking, similar to a GPS system in your car. A tiny tracking sensor attached to the trans-rectal ultrasound probe generates a small, localized electromagnetic field that helps determine the location and orientation of the biopsy device. A sophisticated algorithm maintains the fusion of MRI and ultrasound images, even if the patient moves during the procedure.

“Our patients realize multiple benefits with the availability of this technology,” said Dr. Lynch. “We now have the ability to obtain biopsies with such precision that we can reduce the number of tissue samples acquired during the course of care, which subsequently reduces the risk of infection, bleeding, pain and recovery time.”

According to the American Cancer Society, prostate cancer is the most common cancer, other than skin cancer, in American men. In fact, one in six men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer during his lifetime, compared to one in eight women developing breast cancer.

“With the growing prevalence of prostate cancer, we are proud to be among the first to offer this new technology,” said Dr. Lynch. “We are providing the best possible methods for identifying suspicious prostate lesions and, in doing so, are bringing new hope to our patients.”

Category : Cancer , Innovation ,

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