MedStar Georgetown Joins Elite Group of Hospitals, Only 50 in the Nation, to Receive Prestigious Magnet® Designation for a Fourth Consecutive Time

(Washington, D.C.)  - MedStar Georgetown University Hospital proudly announces it has achieved Magnet® designation for the fourth consecutive time by the American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC).  MedStar Georgetown is now one of just 50 other institutions in the United States to be recognized by the Magnet Recognition Program® four times in a row.   

MedStar Georgetown was the first hospital in Washington, D.C. to achieve Magnet status back in 2004.

“I am so incredibly proud of our nurses,” says Michael C. Sachtleben, president of MedStar Georgetown University Hospital. “We are honored to be acknowledged by the ANCC’s Magnet Recognition Program and to achieve this prestigious designation for a fourth time.”

On a conference call today, the ANCC representatives shared the outcome of a recent site survey and agreed that MedStar Georgetown has met its rigorous expectations of quality and nursing excellence.

 “While the Magnet designation allows us to attract and retain top nursing talent, it is not strictly a ‘nursing’ recognition,” says Eileen Ferrell, MS, BSN, RN, chief nursing officer at MedStar Georgetown. “This designation can only be attained through the highly functional and collaborative work between all departments and associates here at MedStar Georgetown.  It also means our nurses are involved in clinical research and performance improvement, all in the best interests of our patients.”

ANCC bestowed its first Magnet designation in 1994 with the idea that the honor would act as a “magnet” for excellence by promoting professionalism in nursing. Magnet recognition is seen as the highest accolade a hospital nursing system can achieve.

A study found better patient outcomes in hospitals whose nurses had achieved Magnet recognition.  The research results were published in the October 2012 issue of Medical Care, the official journal of the Medical Care section of the American Public Health Association.

“Our nurses at MedStar Georgetown exhibit the highest of standards when it comes to professionalism and excellence in caring for our patients,” says Sachtleben. “I know I join all of my colleagues here at MedStar Georgetown in expressing how grateful we are for their role in taking their profession to such a high level of quality and excellence.” 

Magnet recognition is bestowed upon an organization for a four-year time frame, and an organization that desires to continue to be recognized must re-apply for the designation.

 

About MedStar Georgetown University Hospital

MedStar Georgetown University Hospital is a not-for-profit, acute-care teaching and research hospital with 609 licensed beds located in Northwest Washington, D.C. Founded in the Jesuit principle of cura personalis—caring for the whole person—MedStar Georgetown is committed to offering a variety of innovative diagnostic and treatment options within a trusting and compassionate environment.

MedStar Georgetown’s centers of excellence include neurosciences, transplant, cancer and gastroenterology. Along with Magnet® nurses, internationally recognized physicians, advanced research and cutting-edge technologies, MedStar Georgetown’s healthcare professionals have a reputation for medical excellence and leadership.

About the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s (ANCC) Magnet Recognition Program®          

The Magnet Recognition Program® administered by the American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC), the largest and most prominent nurses credentialing organization in the world, recognizes healthcare organizations that provide the very best in nursing care and professionalism in nursing practice. The Magnet Recognition Program serves as the gold standard for nursing excellence and provides consumers with the ultimate benchmark for measuring quality of care. For more information about the Magnet Recognition Program and current statistics, visit www.nursecredentialing.org/magnet.

Media Contact

Marianne Worley
Director of Media Relations
Office: 703-558-1287
Pager: 202-405-2824
[email protected]

Brendan McNamara 
Media Relations Specialist
Office: 703-558-1593
[email protected]

Inpatient Unit is First in D.C. to Earn National Award for Medical/Surgical Excellence

MedStar Georgetown University Hospital’s C6-2 inpatient medical/surgical unit recently became the first hospital in the District of Columbia and the 22nd in the United States to receive the prestigious AMSN PRISM Award. This award recognizes only those medical/surgical units that consistently demonstrate exceptional nursing practice, effective leadership, a healthy practice environment and evidence-based, positive clinical outcomes.

Co-sponsored by the Academy of Medical-Surgical Nurses (AMSN) and the Medical-Surgical Nursing Certification Board (MSNCB), the PRISM Award stands for “Premier Recognition In the Specialty of Med-Surg.”

In a special celebration to present the staff of the C6-2 unit with the award, President of the MSNCB Mimi Haskins, DNP, RN, CNS, CMSRN remarked, “I am thrilled to announce the newest recipient of the AMSN PRISM Award, which is the C6-2 med/surg unit here at MedStar Georgetown University Hospital – congratulations! C6-2 really and truly embodies what the PRISM Award stands for: strong leadership in collaborative governance, effective nurse training and professional empowerment. After our peer reviewers from around the country conducted their assessment of your unit, their remarks were great and I’m proud to say you got straight A’s! They were particularly impressed with your injury prevention strategies, your excellent recruitment and retention practices, as well as your robust use of data and strong professional collaboration in assuring high quality care.”

According to the AMSN, there are more than 600,000 medical-surgical nurses practicing in the United States today, making them the single largest group of specialty nurses working in hospital settings. Med-surg nurses oversee a broad spectrum of patient care responsibilities, which inspired the acronym “PRISM” to be chosen as the name for the award.

“It’s a great honor and privilege for me to be here with our nurses from C6-2 as they receive the PRISM Award,” said MedStar Georgetown’s Chief Nursing Officer Eileen Ferrell, MS, BSN, RN. “To put this in perspective, there are about 5,000 hospitals in the United States with many, many more med/surg units. To be one of only 22 recognized with this award is quite remarkable. I believe that the work C6-2 does on a daily basis is just extraordinary. This team, lead by Cindy Minetree, exudes excellence, compassion and professionalism as they care for a very diverse and complicated patient population. Congratulations to the entire team on C6-2!”

Haskins echoed Ferrell’s remarks and noted that to be exceptional as a nurse, it takes a high level of professional dedicated to one’s individual practice, but in order to achieve and sustain outstanding patient outcomes and high staff satisfaction, it takes a dynamic, energetic and committed group of professionals who work as a team.

“As a team on C6-2, we are a premier unit and it is an honor to a part of this group that is so committed to our patients and co-workers,” said C6-2 Clinical Manager Cynthia Minetree, MSN, RN, NE-BC upon receiving the award. “We have the honor of being supported by so many other great teams throughout our organization as we take care of our patients and strengthen our staff satisfaction. While we always strive to do better for our patients, families and each other, this award will inspire us even more to continue improving patient outcomes and our overall professional practice.”

Marianne Worley
Director of Media Relations
Office: 703-558-1287
Pager: 202-405-2824
[email protected]

Nursing Studies Aim For Better Patient Care at Medstar Georgetown

(Washington, D.C.) – The Magnet® nurses at MedStar Georgetown University Hospital are conducting studies aimed at improved and even more supportive patient care.

“Nurses often work the closest and the longest hours with our patients, so their input can really make a huge difference,” said Kimberly Groner, MSN, RN, ANP-C, CCRC, NE-BC, director of Professional Practice, Research and Outcomes at MedStar Georgetown.

 “MedStar Georgetown nurses have studied new ways to benefit our patients for many years. I’ve seen nursing research make strides in specialties like transplant, pain management, rheumatologic diseases, cognitive and behavioral therapy, exercise and arthritis.”

One study involves nurses at MedStar Georgetown and their perceptions, comfort and support of advance care planning. On National Healthcare Decisions Day on April 16 Georgetown nurses set up information tables, handed out packets and answered questions from 220 patients and visitors about advance care planning.   Study leaders will use a survey taken by two groups of nurses to gauge whether or not the event influenced their knowledge and perceptions.

“Our nurses want to have the knowledge and comfort to assist patients who need information about advance care planning, “said Groner. “This study will look at whether or not getting involved with an effort to educate the public helps.”

Debra Long, a recent in-patient at MedStar Georgetown discusses her opinions on the video tool study with principal investigator Marlena Fisher, BSN, RN, CCRN
Debra Long, a recent in-patient at MedStar Georgetown discusses her opinions on the video tool study with principal investigator Marlena Fisher, BSN, RN, CCRN

Another study uses a video tool to provide patients and their families with information in laypersons’ terms about cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), life support and patient/family confidence in their decisions about end of life care.  

“Participants take a questionnaire before and after viewing a ten minute video to see if their knowledge on these important topics improves,” said Groner. Our aim is to survey fifty people at first and if we find it helpful, we will make the video a standard practice to include more patients because we will have evidence-based research to prove that it works.”

Debra Long, a recent in-patient at MedStar Georgetown participated in the video tool study administered by principal investigator Marlena Fisher, BSN, RN, CCRN.

Debra Long, a recent in-patient at MedStar Georgetown, participated in the video tool study.
Debra Long views the video tool on about cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), life support, and other subjects related to care.

“I thought the video was very helpful,” said Long.  I was very comfortable watching it and I think others would benefit from the information provided. I have talked with my family members about these very issues.”

“Research has shown that traditional methods to educate patients about CPR and life-sustaining measures haven’t worked very well,” said Fisher. “We want to provide our patients with the terms used by the medical community and see if the video helps them retain the information. Participation in the survey is completely voluntary.”

MedStar Georgetown nurses are also studying the effects of a curriculum whose purpose is to improve the care of the elderly, called NICHE, Nurses Improving Care for Health System Elders.

MedStar Georgetown nurses, who are already NICHE certified are looking at a protocol that could mean a better night’s sleep for some older patients.

“The nurses consulted with physicians and proposed taking patients’ vital signs at 10 p.m. and 6 a.m. instead of midnight and 8 a.m.,” said Groner. We think these might be hours when patients are actually sleeping and we want to determine if this allows for a more restful patient experience. It could be a very simple and practical way to help our patient get better sleep and maybe even heal faster.”

MedStar Georgetown was the first center in Washington, D.C. to achieve prestigious Magnet status back in 2004 by the American Nurses’ Credentialing Center (ANCC) and joins just 71 other institutions, or fewer than seven percent of hospitals nationwide, to be recognized by the Magnet Recognition Program® three times in a row.  The program recognizes healthcare organizations for quality patient care, nursing excellence and innovations in professional nursing practice.

Nurses-National-Healthcare-Decisions-Day-by-M-Worley

 

About MedStar Georgetown University Hospital

MedStar Georgetown University Hospital is a not-for-profit, acute-care teaching and research hospital with 609 beds located in Northwest Washington, D.C. Founded in the Jesuit principle of cura personalis—caring for the whole person—MedStar Georgetown is committed to offering a variety of innovative diagnostic and treatment options within a trusting and compassionate environment.

MedStar Georgetown’s centers of excellence include neurosciences, transplant, cancer and gastroenterology. Along with Magnet® nurses, internationally recognized physicians, advanced research and cutting-edge technologies, MedStar Georgetown’s healthcare professionals have a reputation for medical excellence and leadership. MedStar Georgetown University Hospital—Knowledge and Compassion Focused on You.

 

Media Contact

Marianne Worley
[email protected]
703-558-1287

Prestigious Magnet® Designation Bestowed to Nursing Program at MedStar Georgetown University Hospital—For the Third Time

American Nurses Credentialing Center Magnet Recognition Program® is an Indicator for Excellence in Patient Care

(Washington, D.C.) – January 9, 2014 - MedStar Georgetown University Hospital proudly announces it has achieved Magnet® designation for the third consecutive time by the American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC). MedStar Georgetown joins just 71 other institutions or fewer than seven percent of hospitals nationwide, to be recognized by the Magnet Recognition Program® three times in a row.

MedStar Georgetown was the first hospital in Washington, D.C. to achieve Magnet status back in 2004.

“We are honored to be acknowledged by the ANCC’s Magnet Recognition Program and to achieve this prestigious designation for a third time,” said Richard Goldberg, MD, president of MedStar Georgetown University Hospital. “Our nurses at MedStar Georgetown exhibit the highest of standards when it comes to professionalism and excellence in caring for our patients. I know I join all of my colleagues at MedStar Georgetown in expressing how proud we are to work with them each day and how grateful we are for their role in taking their profession to such a high level of quality and distinction.”

ANCC bestowed its first Magnet designation in 1994 with the idea that the honor would act as a “magnet” for excellence by promoting professionalism in nursing. Magnet recognition is seen as the highest accolade a hospital nursing system can achieve.

A recent study found better patient outcomes in hospitals whose nurses had achieved Magnet recognition. The research results were published in the October 2012 issue of Medical Care, the official journal of the Medical Care section of the American Public Health Association.

“Receiving this national designation by the Magnet Recognition Program points to the excellence of our nurses and all their hard work,” said Eileen Ferrell, MS, BSN, RN, chief nursing officer at MedStar Georgetown. “It means our nurses are high-performing professionals who are committed to delivering extraordinary care to our patients and their families. It also means our nurses are involved in clinical research and performance improvement, all in the best interests of our patients.”

Currently the ANCC asks each institution applying for Magnet status to submit a plan on how the organization will achieve an 80-percent rate of nurses with baccalaureate degree or higher in nursing. This target is consistent with The Institute of Medicine’s report on “The Future of Nursing” which recommends an increase in the number of nurses with baccalaureate degrees to 80-percent by 2020. MedStar Georgetown is proud to have already met this goal with more than 80-percent of our nurses holding a bachelor’s degree or higher in nursing.

Magnet recognition is bestowed upon an organization for a four-year time frame, and an organization that desires to continue to be recognized must re-apply for the designation.

About MedStar Georgetown University Hospital

MedStar Georgetown University Hospital is a not-for-profit, acute-care teaching and research hospital with 609 beds located in Northwest Washington, D.C. Founded in the Jesuit principle of cura personalis—caring for the whole person—MedStar Georgetown is committed to offering a variety of innovative diagnostic and treatment options within a trusting and compassionate environment.

MedStar Georgetown’s centers of excellence include neurosciences, transplant, cancer and gastroenterology. Along with Magnet® nurses, internationally recognized physicians, advanced research and cutting-edge technologies, MedStar Georgetown’s healthcare professionals have a reputation for medical excellence and leadership.

About The American Nurses Credentialing Center’s (ANCC) Magnet Recognition Program®

The Magnet Recognition Program® administered by the American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC), the largest and most prominent nurses credentialing organization in the world, recognizes healthcare organizations that provide the very best in nursing care and professionalism in nursing practice. The Magnet Recognition Program serves as the gold standard for nursing excellence and provides consumers with the ultimate benchmark for measuring quality of care. For more information about the Magnet Recognition Program and current statistics, visit www.nursecredentialing.org/magnet.

Media Contact

Marianne Worley
[email protected]
703-558-1287