For many cancer patients, interventional radiology is a key component of their diagnostic and treatment experience. From confirmation of an initial diagnosis to late-stage pain relief, radiological procedures are common throughout all phases of cancer care.

Performing most interventional radiology procedures requires only a small incision – the size of a pinhole. This reduces the risk of complications and allows for faster healing time.  Most of the procedures are completed in a single day and a majority of the patients undergoing any of these procedures are discharged on the same day as the procedure.

Primary Liver Cancer (Hepatocellular Carcinoma, HCC)

Liver cancer is one of the most common malignancies worldwide, affecting nearly one million individuals. The most common cancer that begins in the liver is called hepatocellular carcinoma or HCC. HCC is associated with several chronic liver diseases (including alcoholic cirrhosis, chronic Hepatitis B, and Hepatitis C) and certain metabolic conditions (including hemochromatosis, autoimmune hepatitis, and primary biliary cholangitis).

Interventional radiologists play a crucial role in the treatment of HCC. For patients with limited disease, potentially curative therapies include radiofrequency ablation (RFA), microwave ablation and irreversible electroporation (IRE).

For patients with more advanced disease, trans-arterial chemoembolization (TACE) has been established as the standard therapy of choice. Trans-arterial radioembolization (TARE) is another treatment option for patients with both limited and advanced disease.

Patients with cancer related pain are often eligible for palliative treatments such as nerve blocks, bone/spine ablation, and kyphoplasty. Palliative pain relief can increase comfort and dramatically improve quality of life.

Colorectal Cancer

Colorectal cancer develops in the final part of the digestive system, the colon and rectum. The colon is part of the large intestine and the rectum is the tissue that connects the large intestine to the anus. Most colorectal cancers develop slowly over several years. Usually, this type of cancer starts as a pre-cancerous polyp on the lining of the colon or rectum, then grows into the tissue wall, blood vessels, or lymph vessels. Sometimes, cancer also spreads to other parts of the body (metastatic disease).

Initial diagnosis of metastatic colon cancer is often made by an interventional radiologist through an image-guided biopsy. For patients requiring chemotherapy, Mediports can be placed to facilitate the administration of chemotherapy.

A variety of treatments, including ablative therapies, TACE and TARE, are available for patients with metastatic disease that has spread to the liver, lungs and/or bone.

Colorectal cancer can cause patients discomfort, but palliative procedures can help. These therapies include nerve blocks, bone/spine ablation, and kyphoplasty.

Pancreatic Cancer

Pancreatic cancer develops between the stomach and spine, deep in the abdomen. The pancreas in an organ that produces enzymes that help break down food and hormones that control blood sugar levels. Pancreatic cancer is fairly rare, but has one of the highest fatality rates for cancer.

Diagnosis of pancreatic cancer can be challenging. In part, this is because the disease does not usually cause detectable symptoms in its early stages. The location of the pancreas and the organ’s complex role in regulating the body further complicate diagnosis. Interventional radiologists often diagnose the disease through an image-guided biopsy.

When cancer is localized to the pancreas and surgery is not an option, a novel minimally invasive treatment called irreversible electroporation (IRE) may improve outcomes. For patients who require chemotherapy, Mediports can help facilitate treatment.

Sometimes, pancreatic cancer spreads to the liver. A variety of treatments are available to treat metastatic liver cancer.

Patients with cancer-related pain are often eligible for palliative treatments such as nerve blocks, bone/spine ablation, and kyphoplasty. These treatments can help patients to feel more comfortable and find renewed enjoyment in life.

Bile Duct Cancer

Bile duct cancer (also known as cholangiocarcinoma) is a type of tumor which starts in the bile duct, a series of tubes connecting the liver to the intestines. The bile duct transports bile from the liver to the intestinal tract, which functions to help digest dietary fat. Initial diagnosis of bile duct cancer is often made by an interventional radiologist through an image-guided biopsy.

When tumors block the healthy drainage of bile, patients can experience jaundice (yellowing of skin), itching or infection.  These blockage-related symptoms are often the first signs of bile duct cancer. An interventional radiologist can place a drain or a stent to relieve this obstruction.

For patients requiring chemotherapy, Mediports can be placed to facilitate the administration of chemotherapy. When bile duct cancer is located within the liver itself (intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma), local treatment strategies are often the best non-surgical options. A variety of treatments are available for patients with metastatic disease that has spread to liver tissue.

Bile duct cancer can cause discomfort. Patients with cancer related pain are often eligible for palliative treatments such as nerve blocks, bone/spine ablation, and kyphoplasty. All of these minimally-invasive treatments have the potential to improve patients’ quality of life.

Breast Cancer

Breast cancer is a cancer that develops in breast tissue, sometimes spreading to other parts of the body. It is the second most common cancer in American women.

Image-guided biopsy is often used for initial diagnosis. For patients requiring chemotherapy, Mediports can be placed to facilitate the administration of chemotherapy. A variety of treatments are available for patients with metastatic disease that has spread to liver tissue.

Pain relief is an important part of cancer care. Patients with cancer-related pain are often eligible for palliative treatments such as nerve blocks, bone/spine ablation, and kyphoplasty. These radiological procedures can help patients to feel more comfortable.

Lung Cancer

The lungs are two sponge-like organs found in the chest, which bring air in and out of the body. More Americans die each year from lung cancer than from breast, prostate, and colorectal cancers combined. However, up to 80 percent of lung cancers are curable if caught early. Initial diagnosis of metastatic lung cancer is often made by an interventional radiologist through an image-guided biopsy.

Various therapies are performed by interventional radiologists to treat lung cancers.  Treatment options include radiofrequency ablation (RFA), microwave ablation and cryoablation.  These can often be curative in a single session in small tumors. Most patients undergoing these procedures are often discharged same day as the procedure.

For patients requiring chemotherapy, Mediports can be placed to facilitate the administration of chemotherapy.

Patients with cancer-related pain are often eligible for palliative treatments such as nerve blocks, bone/spine ablation, and kyphoplasty which can dramatically improve patients’ quality of life.

Kidney Cancer

The kidneys are a pair of bean-shaped organ situated in the back, just below the ribcage. The kidneys clean impurities from the blood. According to the American Cancer Society, approximately 30,000 cases of kidney cancer are diagnosed in the United States each year.

Interventional radiology is often a major part of kidney cancer diagnosis and care.  Image-guided biopsy is a common technique used for diagnosis. Minimally invasive therapies such as radiofrequency ablation (RFA), cryoablation and irreversible electroporation (IRE) are potentially curative treatment options. For patients requiring chemotherapy, Mediports can be placed to facilitate the administration of chemotherapy.

Kidney cancer can cause discomfort, but radiological procedures can also be very effective in alleviating pain. Patients with cancer-related pain are often eligible for palliative treatments such as nerve blocks, bone/spine ablation, and kyphoplasty which can dramatically improve patients’ quality of life.

Neuroendocrine tumors

The body’s brain, nervous system, and endocrine system work together to produce and regulate hormones. This critical partnership is called the neuroendocrine system. Neuroendocrine tumors grow in the organs of the neuroendocrine system, causing them to produce abnormal amounts of hormones.

Neuroendocrine tumors may be either benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). When a neuroendocrine tumor is malignant, cancerous cells can break away and spread to other parts of the body in a process called metastasis. Even when a tumor is benign, it can still create serious health problems by disrupting the body’s hormone balances.

Image-guided biopsy can be a key diagnostic tool. For patients requiring chemotherapy, Mediports can be placed to facilitate the administration of chemotherapy. For patients with disease spread to the liver, a variety of therapies including ablation, TACE and TARE are available.

Patients with cancer-related pain are often eligible for palliative treatments such as nerve blocks, bone/spine ablation, and kyphoplasty. These minimally-invasive radiological interventions can significantly improve quality of life.

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855-546-0617

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