The Center for Intestinal Care and Transplant

The Center for Intestinal Care and Transplant at MedStar Georgetown Transplant Institute, the only program in the Nation's capital and one of only a few Medicare-approved centers nationwide, offers new and successful surgical and medical options for adults and children suffering from disabling and life-threatening intestinal disorders and liver disease.

Our small bowel transplant team manages about 100 small bowel transplants a year. 60-70 of those are for children 18 and younger.

About the Center for Intestinal Care and Transplant at MedStar Georgetown Transplant Institute

Patients with small bowel disease may need to consider a small bowel transplant or intestinal surgery. In a small bowel transplant, the diseased portion of the small intestine is removed and replaced with a healthy small intestine from a donor. This procedure can be lifesaving for patients with irreversible intestinal failure that has become life-threatening. Learn more about small bowel disease

The Center for Intestinal Care and Transplant at MedStar Georgetown University Hospital, the only program in the Nation's capital and one of only a handful of Medicare-approved centers nationwide, offers new and successful surgical and medical options for adults and children suffering from disabling and life-threatening intestinal disorders and liver disease. Once considered experimental, intestinal transplantation is now an important surgical therapy.

Why choose the Center for Intestinal Care and Transplant at MedStar Georgetown Transplant Institute for my small bowel transplant?

  • Expertise: Our small bowel transplant team manages about 100 small bowel transplant a year. 60-70 of those are for children 18 and younger.
  • Teamwork: our staff displays remarkable teamwork and offers patients the best possible care from a Transplant Team of different health professionals.
  • Availability: a transplant surgeon is on call 24 hours a day, seven days a week to evaluate organs for potential transplantation
  • Outcomes: Adult patient one-year survival rate is 94.4 percent, compared to 79.45 percent nationally. Pediatric patient one-year survival is 90.48 percent in contrast to 86.08 nationally.

Small Bowel Transplant Expectations:

  • Evaluation: Patients undergo a series of tests to determine if they are a candidate for small bowel transplantation. 
  • Donor: The transplant program coordinates with the local and national transplant lists to find a donor organ. Organ allocation is based on medical urgency, time on the waiting list and blood type compatibility. Living donors also must undergo evaluation, and must have compatible blood types.
  • Surgery: The transplant surgeon removes the donor organ, removes the recipient’s damaged small bowel and then attaches the new donor small bowel.
  • Recovery: Most small bowel recipients spend several weeks in the hospital. Doctors monitor small bowel recipients closely for signs of organ rejection, infection or other complications.

Caring for small bowel transplantation patients

Our goal is to provide you with all the information you need to undergo a healthy small bowel transplantation process. Our program is based on the patient’s physical, emotional and spiritual needs and welcomes the active participation of family members throughout the transplant process.

We invite you to learn more about our program, including:

 

Who We Are

The Center for Intestinal Care and Transplant at MedStar Georgetown University Hospital, the only program in the Nation’s capital and one of only a handful of Medicare-approved centers nationwide, offers new and successful surgical and medical options for adults and children suffering from disabling and life-threatening intestinal disorders and liver disease.

Once considered experimental, intestinal transplantation is now an important surgical therapy. Some of the most common disorders treated at the Center for Intestinal Care and Transplant include:

  • Short Gut syndromes
  • Malabsorption syndromes
  • Motility Disorders
  • Tumors of the Intestinal Mesentery

Patient survival rates

Under the team’s care, patient survival rates post-intestinal transplant are among the best in the world. This directly correlates to the team’s depth of experience and interdisciplinary approach to transplant management, as well as their dedication to state-of-the-art molecular diagnostics and clinical research into the field of transplantation.

On average, the time to independence from TPN is:

  • About three weeks for patients who undergo an intestinal transplant
  • Four to six weeks for patients who undergo multi-organ transplantation

Multi-disciplinary small bowel transplant team

In addition, the program offers a multi-disciplinary team that includes:

  • Dedicated medical director and surgical director
  • Nurse coordinator
  • Nutritionist
  • Research and data coordinators
  • Social worker for both patients and families

Who is on the transplant team?

The most important member of the transplant team is you. We have numerous, experienced small bowel transplant professionals who will be a part of your transplant team and interact with you during different times of your liver transplantation process.

Your transplant team will include:

  • Transplant surgeon: This doctor will perform the small bowel transplantation. Your surgeon is the lead physician on your care, and will coordinate your care and answer all your questions.
  • Transplant gastroenterologist (GI): your GI specializes in the care of patients with small bowel disease. Your GI will monitor your health during the transplantation process.
  • Anesthesiologist: this physician will make sure your heart and lungs are healthy enough to undergo a transplant.
  • Pre-transplant coordinator: this team member is a Registered Dietitian who will meet with you and answer all your questions. He or she will be your main contact, and will work with other members of the team to coordinate your care.
  • Clinical transplant donor coordinator: your donor coordinator can help you understand the entire transplant process.
  • Transplant social worker: your social worker will evaluate your ability to deal with the stress of a transplant as well as your social support system, including friends and family who can help you with the demands of a major surgery. Your social worker will also evaluate any substance abuse issues that may interfere with a healthy small bowel transplantation process.
  • Transplant psychiatrist: this physician will evaluate you if the transplant social worker thinks it is necessary. He or she will make determinations about your mental health and determine if there are any substance abuse issues to manage.
  • Financial coordinator: an expert in all the financial issues surrounding transplants, he or she will meet with you to discuss the costs associated with a transplant, as well as the cost of the medications you will need for the rest of your life to manage your new, healthy organ. He or she is available to answer any of your financial or insurance questions.
  • Staff nurse: after surgery, you will have one nurse assigned to you who will manage your health in the surgical intensive care unit while you recuperate. He or she will prepare you for discharge and assist you in learning about how to manage all your medications.
  • Post-transplant coordinator: After your transplant, your post-transplant coordinator will be your main point of contact for any questions you may have. This person will probably be a nurse practitioner or physician assistant, who will remain in contact with you and provide a level of support necessary to manage the care of your new, healthy organ.

 

Make an Appointment

For more information or to schedule an appointment with a small bowel disease specialist, please call our scheduling line:

855-546-2073

 

How can I qualify for small bowel transplantation?

Our goal is to provide you with all the information you need to undergo a healthy small bowel transplantation process. Our program is based on the patient's physical, emotional and spiritual needs and welcomes the active participation of family members throughout the transplant process.

Transplant Clinic Lab Hours

Monday: 7:30 am to 4 pm
Tuesday: 7:30 am to 4 pm
Wednesday: 9 am to 6 pm
Thursday: 7:30 am to 4 pm
Friday: 7 am to 3:30 pm

Research & Clinical Trials

Research is a critical part of what we do at MedStar Georgetown University Hospital. Learn more about our research on treating and managing advanced disease and transplantation surgery.

Keeping Your Organ Healthy

The transplant process is a long and complicated one. Now that your healthy small bowel is functioning inside your body, you must assume responsibility for your everyday care.